Posts Tagged ‘meat

11
Sep
13

bread and meat.

As we packed up after the Buffalo game, I asked Fred if he could come up with an idea or two for the following week’s party. And when he emailed me a couple days later with suggestions for Italian-style sandwiches and Muffulettas.

I think Fred viewed these, which he pulled from Google, as possibilities. But they sounded good to me, and I viewed them as the menu for the San Diego State game.

sammiches

Fred’s notes on the Italian sandwiches:

Italian-Style Sandwiches

• 1 (5.3-oz.) container spreadable goat cheese

• 2 tablespoons refrigerated pesto with basil

• 1 (12-oz.) package ciabatta rolls

• 1 pound variety meats

• 1 1/3 cups firmly packed arugula

• 1/2 cup jarred roasted red bell pepper strips

• 1/4 small red onion, thinly sliced

Wasn’t in the mood for onion and decided to use the full loaves instead of rolls. Also, used mixed greens instead

of only arugula.

Fred found delicious stuff at Costco for these, not the least of which was the amazing crusty bread he used for both. The pesto on these, the Italians, also made these stand out.

Fred found delicious stuff at Costco for these, not the least of which was the amazing crusty bread he used for both. The pesto on these, the Italians, also made these stand out.

And then there were the Muffulettas. The olive spread meant that I wasn’t trying these — olives are one of a few foods that I really wish I liked — but everyone loved them. Here’s what Fred did with those:

Muffulettas

• 2 16-oz. jars mixed pickled vegetables

• 3/4 cup pimiento-stuffed Spanish olives, chopped

• 2 tablespoons bottled olive oil-and-vinegar dressing

• 12 small dinner rolls, cut in half

• 6 Swiss cheese slices, cut in half

• 12 thin deli ham slices

• 12 Genoa salami slices

• 6 provolone cheese slices, cut in half

Used Costco Muffuletta spread instead of making my own. Used provolone only (because I forgot to buy

swiss). Used the same rustic loafs that I used for Italian sandwiches.

Olive-y goodness.

Olive-y goodness.

A couple of other tips from Fred:

  • Best secret in making sub-style sandwiches: Slice open and hollow out the top of each loaf, hollow top slice and the fixins fit much better.
  • Went to Wasserstrom Restaurant Supply for foil bins (used for serving) and beautiful bamboo toothpicks.

The next game is a noon start, which means it’ll be tough for Mrs. Crappy and me to cook. Anyone have any suggestions?

Heh.

05
Sep
13

bob evans would be proud.

When Mrs. Crappy mentioned last week that we weren’t going to start the season with our traditional breakfast casseroles, I was concerned. After tasting what she came up with, I have learned — once again — that I need to shut up. As usual, this post is written by Mrs. Crappy, with commentary from me in italics.

OK kids, a new season calls for new recipes. In an attempt to find something new to feed the Killer Nuts, I modified a crescent roll poppers recipe, ending up with what has been dubbed (by Ethel) Biscuits and Gravy Casserole without the gravy for the Aug. 31, 2013, game in Columbus against the Buffalo Bulls.

The original recipe for ground beef poppers came from Pinterest (of course it did). Initially, I thought what the hell, we can have ground beef for breakfast, but then I got to thinking what if I used breakfast sausage instead. And I didn’t want to wrap up 48 individual crescent rolls as the recipe calls for, so casserole pan it is! Hunger and laziness — two great motivators! BONUS: This recipe contains no eggs (Other than what’s in crescent rolls to begin with.), because we have several tailgaters who do not eat them, no way, no how! As Juan says, “Lips that touch eggs will never touch mine.”

Sorry — we did not do the step-by-step photo process when cooking this week. We’ll do better as season goes on! Promise!

Mostly because she was making these at 5:30 Saturday morning, and who thinks of taking pictures at that hour?

breakfast tight

Sausage Gravy Casserole

What you need:

  • Four refrigerated crescent roll tubes (I used store brand).
  • 2 pounds ground breakfast sausage (It’s Ohio, so I had to use Bob Evans regular breakfast sausage in 1 pound packages in the bacon/sausage/hot dog section of grocery).
  • Two 8-ounce packages of Philadelphia Cream Cheese (Don’t be cheap on this ingredient. Store brands suck!).
  • Butter-flavored cooking spray.

What you do:

  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees, placing racks on middle level. Racks on bottom will burn the bottom of crescent rolls.
  • Spray two baking pans with cooking spray (I used glass Pyrex 11″ X 9″). Cover bottom of each pan with a layer of crescent roll dough. Bake for about 6 to 8 minutes. Pull out of oven and let cool.
  • Cook the sausage in a frying pan, breaking it up into a crumbly consistency. And here is where I would like to experiment with this recipe more: this would be a good place to throw in something like a can of drained green chilies (as the original popper recipe called for) or onions, other vegetables, whatever. I did add a little garlic powder and black pepper.
  • When sausage is cooked and drained, with pan on a lower heat setting (actually, we cooked sausage and refrigerated at night. In morning I reheated) add in all of the cream cheese. Cutting the cheese into chunks helps it melt down faster.
  • Stir, stir, stir! Don’t burn or brown the cheese, but blend it in with the sausage. You’ll end up a creamy, thick paste.
  • Then spread on top of baked dough. Spread it to all corners, right up the the edges. Then cover with another sheet of crescent roll dough, and bake for another 10 to 15 minutes, until dough is light brown.
  • Let cool slightly and cut into whatever size servings you want. Since we had 17 at the tailgate, I made small squares that could be picked up and eaten as finger food or cut with fork. I liked mine with a bit of Frank’s Red Hot sauce on top. The little we had left over and reheated in microwave for about a minute and a half, were excellent, so I think this is a recipe that could be made and then frozen for future use.

The finished casseroles — along with two pans of cheesy potatoes — were dropped in the patented Pound Family Tailgating Box (a large cardboard box with beach towels to insulate whatever stuff we’re bringing) and served, still warm, to our fellow KNTers.

kntbreakfast

This one is a keeper, boys and girls. Ethel was dead on when she said it tasted like Bob Evans biscuits and gravy. I was surprised that there was anything left over, although I was pretty happy about it Sunday morning.

Fred and Ethel are taking over for this Saturday’s game in Columbus against San Diego State. Can’t wait to tell you about what they make!

And … LET’S GO BUCKS!

01
Oct
12

oink. moo.

A couple weeks ago, I announced that here at Killer Nuts Tailgating, we would no longer recognize the Big Ten’s chosen names for its two football conference divisions, as they are stupid.

I also said the B1G’s chosen names would be replaced here by Beef and Pork, appropriate, I thought, for our solidly Midwestern culinary sensibilities.

I am standing by those two assertions.

However. Over the weekend, I began to reconsider the third part of the re-naming equation, which stated that Ohio State plays in the Pork Division. It was the notion that Minnesota and Iowa, both members of the other division, play annually for the Floyd of Rosedale Trophy, pictured above. I thought about Wisconsin, a member of our division, and its reputation for dairy farming. I thought about the pastures that dot northwest Columbus, all owned by Ohio State, and the hundreds of cattle that peer through those fences at traffic on Kenny and Sawmill roads.

And I thought about a delicious, juicy double cheeseburger. (I had been sick all week, and was dying for something other than soup.)

When I announced that we were members of the Pork Division, I immediately got some pushback from other KNTers. I stuck by my pronouncement at the time … but I’m now reconsidering.

So now I’m asking. Are we pork, or are we beef? And you guys get to decide.

A few things to consider:

  • Pork is inherently, and infinitely, more fun.
  • White Castle, which claims to use 100 percent beef in their hamburgers, is based in Columbus.
  • Two members of the other division, Nebraska and Iowa, are among the Top Five beef-producing states.
  • Bacon.
  • Four of the five states represented in our division — Ohio, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Illinois — are among the Top 10 pork-producing states.
  • But so are Iowa and Nebraska, members of the other division.
  • Carnitas.
  • Wisconsin, a member of our division, is second only to California in dairy production.
  • Steak.
  • Without pork, there would be no stuffed pork chops.
  • Without beef, there would be no double cheeseburgers.

So what’s it going to be, boys and girls? Poll closes at 11:59 p.m. Friday.

Photo source.

 

19
Sep
12

we punted.

Yes, we’re late. That’s mostly my fault, as a cold has kept me nailed to the couch for most of the week; Mrs. Crappy did her part, filing this on Monday. Whoops. As always, my comments are in italics. -UC

Week three of the 2012 season found the Buckeyes on a beautiful Saturday playing not-so-beautiful game against the California University at Berkley, who came very, very close to winning, but I’ll leave the game analysis to Uncle Crappy.

Just win, baby.

As for the food analysis, Sept. 15 proved to be an odd day, as the Crappy parents were out of town all week and I had to work late Friday. So early on in the week, we decided to let someone else do the cooking, an option that most of our tailgaters picked as well.

By Friday, we had a count of 15 for the party (very glad to have Aunt Mary up and around again!), so Uncle Crappy had to up our takeout order from City BBQ in Columbus with their “Pig Up and Go” party packages. Our preferred location is on Henderson Road and you can check out the menu here. We got the BP7, which includes, 5 pounds of meat, two 2 1/2 quart sides, sauce and buns. Pulled pork, beef brisket, cole salw and baked beans were the fixings we picked. Crappy Dad looked at it all and told Uncle Crappy there would be tons left over. Yeah, he ended up with enough meat for a sandwich of each. We love our barbecue!

We are thankful to have excellent barbecue options in Pittsburgh; I think City holds up to any of them.

The vinegar-based cole slaw, however, was not a favorite of the crowd and we ended up bring a whole quart back to Pittsburgh, where we plan to make grilled Rachel sandwiches for dinner Tuesday night (Thanks to my illness, we waited until Wednesday night. Totally worth the wait, by the way). Since no one cooked this weekend, and grilled Rachels are easy to make on a Coleman griddle at, say, a tailgate, here is the recipe:

Grilled Rachels, aka the Roasted Turkey Reuben

  • Use either deli turkey or leftover roasted turkey, say after Thanksgiving
  • Deli or marble rye bread, although Martha Stewart recommends sourdough (Martha Stewart would be wrong about that one.)
  • Butter or margarine
  • Coleslaw, whatever kind you like — creamy or vinegar-based (But the vinegar-based one we had was excellent.)
  • Thinly sliced Swiss cheese
  • Russian or Thousand Island dressing

Butter one or both sides of each slice of bread. You pick how much butter you want. Heat frying pan or griddle, like you would for making grilled cheese sandwiches. Spread schmear of dressing on one or both slices of bread. Put one slice butter-side down, on griddle or pan, layering Swiss cheese, turkey and cole slaw on slice. Top with other slice of bread, butter side out, and grill until cheese is melty and the bread is as toasted as you like. Avoid burning bread and feel free to mush down on sandwich with a spatula or to use one of those weights used to make bacon cook flat. You could also use a panni or George Foreman grill. Cut in half and serve with additional dressing if you like extra (and I like extra!)

Deeeelicious.

We also had Suzanne’s cheese dip, potato chips and, this week’s bonus recipe, pumpkin roll.

Easy Pumpkin Roll

  • 3 eggs or 3/4 cup egg substitute
  • 3/4 cup canned pumpkin (not the pumpkin pie mix stuff)
  • 1 cup boxed spice cake mix (preferably a kind with pudding or that says super moist)
  • powdered sugar
  • 1 can creamy style cream cheese frosting at room temp or little warmer

In a medium bowl, beat the eggs with a mixer on high until they are thick and yellow – about 2 minutes (or just shake the container of egg substitute really well). Mix in the pumpkin. Mix in the cake mix.

Spread in a 10 x 15″ jelly roll pan lined with greased wax paper or foil. Bake for about 10 minutes at 375.

Remove from the oven and turn out onto a cotton kitchen , not terry cloth, towel well dusted with powdered sugar. Roll the cake up in the towel and let it cool on a wire rack for around 1/2 hour with seam down. Unroll and spread with the cream cheese frosting. Roll it back up without the kitchen towel this time. Sprinkle with more powdered sugar, roll in plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator. Chilling helps to keep the roll shape.

Or you can make your own cream cheese spread:

  • 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened
  • 1/3 cup real butter, softened
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Blend cream cheese and butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy; add remaining powdered sugar and vanilla, blending well.

So here comes University of Alabama-Birmingham at noon on Saturday. Uncle Crappy and I are going camping and leaving Crappy Dad in charge of tailgate. Will report back on the game and the food next week. Until then — Go Buckeyes! P.S. — I hope we learned how to tackle during the week! (Yes, that would be good.)

10
Sep
12

sweet and hammy.

Mrs. Crappy returns for the second installation of what it was we ate on Saturday. These things were freaking delicious and easy to make, so thanks to her for finding the recipe. As was the case a week ago, I’ll add some notes in the photo captions and the text in italics. And finally — bonus points to whomever gets the reference in the headline. -UC

The second week of the 2012 season versus the University of Central Florida Knights gave us a chance to try out a recipe I’ve had my eye on for a while. I found these Hawaiian Sweet Roll Ham Sammies on Pinterest, as all things are these days, by way of beyerbeware.blogspot.com.

Uncle Crappy’s mom Pat has a similar recipe using regular grocery store sandwich rolls instead of the sweet sandwich rolls; Uncle Crappy made them for us years ago. They were very good, making individual sandwiches that are then frozen for future use, but the recipe makes like 40 sandwiches and there were only two of us. Sort of like the first time we went skiing in Snowmass and Uncle Crappy took me to the top of the mountain after four skiing sessions in a county park with a hill (Whiner.).

Anyway, here’s the recipe for Hawaiian Sweet Roll Sammies:

1 package of 12 King’s Hawaiian Sweet Rolls (Distinctive orange packaging. Uncle Crappy found ours in the deli section of the grocery instead of bread section. After much searching.)
1 onion minced
1 stick of butter
3 tablespoons of Djion mustard
2 teaspoons of Worcestershire sauce
3 teaspoons of poppy seeds (Remember, these can sometimes trigger false positives in urine drug tests, so leave them out if this is something you need to worry about.)
3/4 pound shaved ham (We used Giant Eagle Market District Ham Off the Bone. Good, not overly salty to counter the sweet rolls.)
8 slices of Swiss cheese

Sweet merciful crap, did this smell good.

Melt butter in a small skillet and add onions. Medium heat. Let saute for a few minutes to soften onions, but don’t brown the onions. Mix mustard, Worcestershire sauce and poppy seeds into onion and butter. Simmer for a few minutes, until the onions are soft.

Note that there are a couple different kinds of rolls in those pans. I couldn’t find three packages of sweet rolls in the two stores I visited, so I did some improvising, using the sweet deli buns as well. Didn’t notice a difference at all.

Slice rolls as a slab (not individual rolls) lengthwise, and place bottom in an aluminum foil lined 13′ x 9″ baking pan. Spread 3/4 of onion mixture on roll bottoms, then layer ham and cheese on top. Place top of rolls on the pile, spreading the remaining onion mixture over the top of the rolls. Cover with foil and refrigerate until ready to bake.

This is the butter/mustard goop spread on the bottoms of the buns. Make sure you hold back enough to coat the tops, too.

The finished sammiches, ready to be baked. Under the bun tops are layers of ham and Swiss cheese. Note: I got three packages of bread for two casseroles. I also fudged the amount of ham and cheese upwards a bit.

Bake covered with foil for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

And they’re done. A little sweet, and meaty and goopy with cheese. This recipe is a keeper.

Uncle Crappy put two of these casseroles together on Friday and then we baked Saturday morning before going to tailgate. Refer to last week’s entry about how we transport hot things to the tailgate. We were warned when we got to Columbus that we might have six additional tailgaters, so we whipped the Eggless Sausage Casserole from last weekend out of the freezer and cooked it too. Good thing, too — with 15 very hungry people, we came away with about a quarter casserole of the sammies, which Uncle Crappy and I ate for dinner Sunday.

Not the most artful shot of the cake — sorry ’bout that — but hooboy, was it good.

Additional food included: Chilled Cajun shrimp, which I’ll get the recipe for, and My Grandma’s of New England Coffee Cake, which is honestly the best coffee cake I have ever had and will be ordering for Christmas presents this year! We had the plain coffee cake, but we all want to try the other flavors too, especially the blueberry. Interested? You’ll find all the info here.

And the bonus recipe this week is for Suzanne’s Jarlsberg Cheese Dip — 2 cups chopped red onions, 2 cups mayonnaise, 2 cups shredded Jarlsberg cheese, mix together in a dish. Chill and serve with crackers. Now, in looking up this recipe, I found that it is meant to be baked at 350 degrees for 20 minutes and served warm. I have never had it that way and it is one of those that you can’t stop eating cold, so I wonder what the warm version is like. My cousin also makes it cold, but loads it with fresh cracked black pepper, which is yummy. Someone out there, bake it and report back what its like warm.

Now looking forward to Saturday’s match up with University of California Golden Bears, and wondering what we’ll eat! Go Buckeyes!

12
Sep
11

two weeks, one weak.

It was supposed to be like this anyway...

We’re two weeks into the season. The tailgates have been good, the parking has been ideal and the football … well, I’m not sure about the football yet. Here’s a rundown:

The Parking: Hooboy, this has been the best part about the season so far. you’ll recall that we felt pretty good about getting back to our usual lot before the season started, and so far, that’s worked perfectly. We have shade, we don’t have crowds and we have nearly all of the things — with the possible exception of grass — that we’ve enjoyed in the past. It could be that no one has questioned us about being there because no one has noticed us, but with each week, I’m feeling better about the prospects of us just being able to stay there.

The parties: As is often the case attendance was a little light the first week, but we recovered nicely on Saturday. The noon games are tough — tough on me, because I’m up at 5 a.m., and tough on the rest of y’all, because there just isn’t a whole lot of tailgate party to work with before it’s time to pack up and go inside. I am hopeful we won’t have many more noon starts for the rest of the year.

And did we eat well? Yes we did. Bud volunteered to make his breakfast hash for the first week; we’ve covered that recipe here before, and in spite of some technical difficulties with the propane skillet, it was as good as it always was.

I did the Groundhog-standard eggless breakfast casseroles on Saturday, and they were apparently popular. The basic recipe is here, but of course, I made some changes. One was simple — the base, but I substituted two pounds of bacon for the two pounds of sausage. The other was tweaked a little more. I used a pound of regular ground sausage and a pound of spicy; I also added a couple diced jalapenos to the mix, enough for flavor but not so much that it would blow anyone’s head off.

And it was good.

The pigskin: Damn, we looked good against Akron. Bauserman had the kind of day I didn’t know he was capable of, the receivers were sharp — THREE TOUCHDOWN CATCHES BY A TIGHT END WHAT? — and we didn’t appear to miss the suspended starters a whole bunch. It was the kind of game that made you feel good — but you realize that the opponent was good enough that you learned a whole lot about what to expect from your team later on.

And then there was Toledo.

I’m hoping that the near-upset was because of a couple of things: the fact that the Rockets are really good (we’ll find out more about that this weekend, when they host Boise State), and the attention of the Buckeyes was focused more on Miami this week than the game last week. Whether or not that’s the case, here’s one thing that’s certain — if Toledo hadn’t racked up the penalties they had, we would have lost that game. To an in-state team. For the first time since 1921.

Ouch.

I don’t think a lack of focus will be a problem this weekend, but hooboy the competition gets a lot better. We don’t know if the NCAA will let us have the Charity Three — as opposed to the Tat Four — back for the game against the Hurricanes, but their guys who were suspended in Week One, including quarterback Jacory Harris, will be back on the field,  if they don’t crash any more Jet Skis into yachts in the interim.

How good is Ohio State? I think we’ll know the answer to that question by about 11 Saturday night.

20
Nov
10

iowa got smoked.

About a week ago, I was trying to figure out where Mrs. Crappy and I were going to watch the Iowa game.

And then Matlock and the Coochie Doctor said they were going to fire up the smoker for the game. And we found ourselves driving to Columbus to watch an Ohio State game on television.

Oh, and eat huge piles of freshly smoked pulled pork. Here’s the CD explaining the sauces and Matlock — with the help of Mrs. Crappy and Juan — picking the meat he just brought inside:

18
Nov
10

hang those chads.

A quick reminder: I’ll close the voting on our Michigan meats of choice tonight, so if you have a strong preference, get your votes in now.

15
Nov
10

meat!

It’s a tradition with a history nearly as long and illustrious as the Killer Nuts Tailgate parties themselves: Fred makes sausage for the Michigan game.

This tradition has its roots way back when Fred, then a vegetarian, ate a sample of prosciutto while on a flight to Italy. He didn’t just fall of the vegetarian wagon — he jumped off, slashed the wagon’s tires, set the whole thing ablaze and used the flames to  sear a rare 32-ounce porterhouse.

Oh, and he also started making his own sausage. I don’t remember which Michigan game it was when the sausage first appeared, but I know it was a win, and I remember declaring that Fred had to make sausage for the the Michigan tailgate from that point forward until the end of time.

Time has not yet ended, and we’re just a couple weeks away from the Michigan game, so Fred is about ready to make this year’s batch — and that’s where he needs our help. He’s set on making two varieties — a maple breakfast sausage, which has become something of a staple, and a hot Italian sausage, using some of the chilies Mrs. Crappy and I grew this summer. He wants to make two more varieties, but he is unsure which to choose.

And that means it’s time for a poll.

Let’s pretend we live in Florida — vote twice, once for each of these choices that sounds the best for you. We’ll close the poll at midnight Thursday so Fred can have his list ready for a visit to the butcher on Friday.

I asked Fred for brief descriptions of our choices. Here’s what he came up with:

  • Vienna – the little wiener sausages that you can eat by the handful; includes all the major meat groups (beef, pork, veal – yes, veal)
  • Mustardy Beef – this would be our basic beef link.  Would it be a classic or would it be boring?
  • Swedish Potato – beef,  pork butt, pork fat, potatoes.  I will cook these in low-fat chicken broth and they should taste great with any diet soft drink.
  • Cajun Boudin Blanc – considered a “religion” in SW Louisiana.  Pork + pork + pork fat + SPICES + rice + accordion & fiddle music while cooking.
  • Turkey/Cranberry/Nut – what you will have eaten the 2 previous days, but in tubular form.

I can’t see how we can go wrong. Make yer choices people, and Fred will work his magic.

27
Sep
10

breakfast hash.

One of the primary things I wanted to accomplish with KNT was to explain to you exactly how well we eat on Saturday mornings in the parking lot — and how we get there. Crappydad is the first to indulge me, but I hope to offer a more in-depth look at the recipes that drive our parties in the future.

Crappydad working his magic. (Photo by Ethel.)

It was one of the great pleasures of my childhood — those nights when mom wasn’t home for dinner and we had a leftover beef roast of some kind in the fridge, and I knew chances were good that dad would be making hash for dinner.

Part of the reason this was so cool was because it was something generally reserved for the two of us; it always felt a little like we were sort of misbehaving after being left at home without supervision.

And the other part? The hash — a skillet full of meat, eggs, cheese, potatoes and onion — was awfully good.

Crappydad recreated that recipe for the OU game, and I’m still more upset about missing that than missing the battle of the mascots before the game. Getting recipes from my father can be a challenge, because there’s never anything actually written down. But in this case, CD put together a pretty thorough set of instructions, should you want to try this on your own.

And believe me, you do. Dad?

I planned this amount for around 10 people (assuming 5 men/5 women).  Two packages Bob Evans home fries.  I bought about 3 pounds of what Giant Eagle calls “skillet steaks” and nuked them until they were about medium rare.  They were then cut into about 1/2 inch cubes and refrigerated until Saturday morning.  At the tailgate, the potatoes and a half-stick of margerine for each bag went in the skillets first, for about 8-10 minutes.  Then the meat and a couple of chopped, medium-sized yellow onions (I like strong onion taste, not sweet).  This cooked for another 10 or so minutes, occasionally turning.  Then I turned the heat up and (assisted by Bill Joerg and Dick Leiss) added about 18 eggs, breaking the yolks as they went into the pans.  Then a little salt and pepper, turning a few times until the yolks were cooked fairly hard.  Serve with salt/pepper to taste.  I also like Frank’s Hot Sauce and some ketchup on top.  Yum!




2014 schedule

Aug. 30: vs. Navy at Baltimore, noon
Sept. 6: Virginia Tech, 8 p.m.
Sept. 13: Kent State, noon
Sept. 27: Cincinnati, 6 p.m.
Oct. 4: at Maryland
Oct. 18: Rutgers, 3:30 p.m.
Oct. 25: at Penn State, 8 p.m.
Nov. 1: Illinois, 8 p.m.
Nov. 8: at Michigan State, 8 p.m.
Nov. 15: at Minnesota
Nov. 22: Indiana
Nov. 29: Team Up North
Dec. 6: Big Ten Championship

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